Women's Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

Why Compliance Audits Matter in your Licensed Cannabis Facility

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Cannabis Businesses, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses, Women Who Inspire

Why Compliance Audits Matter in your Licensed Cannabis Facility webinar is part of a monthly series on compliance.

This is an opportunity for anyone in a licensed legal State who works in, owns, or is considering starting a cannabis business. 

Topics covered in this webinar are:

*What is an Audit and Why do you need one

*Audit Types

*Third Party Audits

* How to Self Audit

* What does auditing do for your business

*How to prepare for your State Inspection

Jenny Germano is the founder of ICS Consulting Services, national speaker and is one of the instructors for the Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce online business courses: 

How To Open A Dispensary

How To Open An Edibles Company

How to Open A CBD Product Company

ICS Consulting Services

Join us for our next upcoming ICS Webinar Series for June 26th 2019

@ 11 am MST.

 WWW.ICSconsultingService.Com

 

dispensaries

Minority Owned Cannabis Dispensaries and Businesses That Are Shaping the Industry

Posted 2 CommentsPosted in Marijuana Businesses, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Minority Owned Cannabis Dispensaries and Businesses That Are Shaping the Industry:  As the cannabis industry becomes more robust, one way to help combat the war on drugs and its devastating effects on minority Americans is to support your local minority-owned dispensaries and cannabis companies. This is far from a complete list, but here are some great cannabis companies that are owned and operated by minority business owners.

Reposted from Leafly.com written by Lisa Rough

Based out of Oregon, Panacea Valley Gardens is a medical cannabis cultivation facility owned by the co-founder and chairman of the Minority Cannabis Business Association (MCBA), Jesce Horton. He also owns Panacea, an adult-use dispensaries.

In 2016, Horton began developing a new vertically-integrated cannabis cultivation hub known as Saints Cloud. The facility is expected to have a 20,000 foot cultivation space, a dispensary, an onsite processing plant, and water recycling, solar paneling, and a heat exchange system for maximum energy efficiency. Eventually Horton hopes to add an event space, cannabis lounge, and bed & breakfast.

Hollingsworth Cannabis is a family affair involving three generations of the Hollingsworth clan. Located in Washington, this Tier III I-502 licensed cannabis producer and processor offers cannabis flower and infused, triple filtered cannabis oil at a number of different dispensaries across the state.

Raft Hollingsworth III (also known as RT3) works alongside his father, Raft Hollingsworth, Jr., two sisters, and even their 96-year-old grandmother, Dorothy Hollingsworth. With a commitment to environmentally friendly practices, Hollingsworth uses naturally sustainable growing and harvesting practices to ensure that the company’s carbon footprint remains as small as possible.

Simply Pure, a dispensary in Denver, Colorado, is the brainchild of Wanda James and her husband, Scott Durrah. After a successful run at managing Caribbean restaurants, consulting companies, and even a bid for Congress, Ms. James saw a need to shed light on social justice issues related to cannabis. Her brother was arrested and charged with a felony for the possession of cannabis when he was still a teenager, and she saw his future branded with an irreversible mark. In wanting to put a new face on cannabis, she and her husband are aiming to change how the world views cannabis and especially people of color involved with cannabis.

Miguel Trinidad, the brain behind 99th Floor, was a renowned chef of Filipino cuisine when he decided to embrace cannabis with his own invite-only pop-up infused dinners. Trinidad hails from Dominican Republic, but spent time in the Philippines studying the local cuisine before opening a restaurant with his partner, Nicole Ponseca, in New York called Maharlika.

New York has very strict cannabis laws; ergo any invitations to this dinner are exclusive and very hush-hush. Trinidad carefully curates an entire multi-course meal that revolves around the strain chosen for each dinner. Less discreet is Trinidad’s new line of edible products and more gourmet pop-up dinners that will be available on the California cannabis market.

The American Cannabinoid Clinics is made up of a family of physicians who combined their respective fields to help thousands of patients in California, Oregon, and Washington seeking answers about medical marijuana. Dr. Janice Knox spent 35 years working in medicine, but when she retired, she continued to hear from patients that had questions about using medical cannabis.

Knox teamed up with her husband, Dr. David Knox, who has 37 years of clinical experience in Emergency Medicine, as well as both of her daughters; Dr. Jessica Knox, who specializes in Preventive Medicine, and Dr. Rachel Knox, who studied Family and Integrative Medicine. Together, the Knoxes have spent the last six years treating thousands of patients across the Pacific Northwest.

Supernova Woman is an organization formed by Women of Color in Cannabis in 2015 to help foster small cannabis business opportunities to become self-sufficient in the industry. The group, founded by Tsion “Sunshine” Lencho, Amber Senter, Nina Parks, Andrea Unsworth, offers a series called Shades of Green to educate communities of color on how to get involved with legislative efforts for cannabis, and how regulations and local politics can affect your business.

Located in California, the organization also offers professional services on how to build your dispensaries or cannabis business and how to stay in compliance. It works with people who have prior cannabis convictions to help get their records expunged, guiding them through the entire legal process. Supernova is especially aimed at creating and fostering a safe space for women of color in the cannabis industry. One of the founders, Andrea Unsworth, also owns the cannabis collective Stash Twist.

When Lynwood, California began accepting applications for permits in the Los Angeles County, Priscilla Vilchis jumped at the chance to grow and manufacture cannabis products as a Latina woman in the legal California market. With two medical marijuana cultivation and processing licenses already under her belt in Nevada, she won preliminary approval for a new dispensaries, Cali Premium Produce.

In Nevada, one of her flagship brands is cheekily named “Queen of the Desert,” and Vilchis is hoping to expand her flagship products to California. She will also be working on outreach efforts to educate the public and especially older generations in the Hispanic community on the benefits of cannabis.

Corey Stevens wanted to take advantage of the new legal cannabis market in Washington state, but he had no idea of the many obstacles he would have to overcome. Stevens had to fight tooth and nail to get a foot in the door. He applied for a license multiple times, applied for a Conditional Use Permit in the local jurisdiction, and submitted public comments to the county. Though he fought an uphill battle, his persistence paid off. Natural Blessing, dispensaries, opened its doors in July 2016 and has been serving the cannabis community ever since.

Apothecarry was started by a 36-year-old Michigan State University graduate named Whitney Beatty. Initially Beatty did not set out to enter the cannabis industry; rather, she only looked into cannabis for therapeutic reasons after being diagnosed with anxiety. As Beatty became more and more educated and versed in cannabis knowledge, she didn’t identify with the pervasive image of “stoner culture” that stigmatized cannabis for so long. More and more, she found others who lamented the lack of high-quality storage for cannabis that could keep their stash safely out of reach from children and pets.

Available in the United States and Canada, the Apothecarry line includes its most popular product, the Apothecarry Case, a state-of-the-art Humidor organizational system crafted from hardwood and secured with a dual combination and key lock to prevent kids, pets, or nosy neighbors from seeing or smelling your stash. Not only is Apothecarry challenging long-held cannabis stereotypes, it’s one of the few companies owned by a woman of color and the entire operation was funded by minority investors.

Euphorium in Oakland, California, is a woman-owned non-profit cannabis collective and delivery service. The owner, Charlita Brown, comes from a background in pharmaceuticals and uses her knowledge to make sure that patients’ questions are answered and that they are satisfied with both the product and the services provided. Brown also uses her cannabis collective as a platform to help empower women of color in the cannabis industry.

Aaron McCrary got his start as a cannabis cultivator in Washington state, working first underground and then within the legal medical marijuana market. When Nevada voted to legalize cannabis, he took a chance on the emerging market and is now known as the first black master grower in the state.

Zion Gardens, his 6,000-square-foot facility in North Las Vegas, is growing like a weed, and McCrary has plans to expand to a new building by January 2018. During the hiring process, McCrary goes out of his way to provide opportunities for other people of color, women, disabled individuals, and anyone else who might otherwise be excluded.

Commencement Bay Cannabis, the first retail cannabis shop in Fife, Washington, is one of a kind. The Puyallup Tribe, native to the Pacific Northwest, transformed its former high-end cigar lounge, Stogie, into a classy upscale space for retail cannabis customers to peruse menus and make educated purchases. Commencement Bay Cannabis has inspired participation from Puyallup Tribal Council members, the Fife-Milton-Edgewood Chamber of Commerce, and other local business owners. The store celebrates the spirit of Mount Tahoma and the Puyallup River while providing high-quality cannabis in a judgement-free environment.

Women's Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce moving women beyond empowering and inspiring into action and business success.

weed wedding

Weed wedding planners manage couples’ high expectations

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Women Owned Cannabis Businesses, Women Who Inspire

Cannabis loving couples say “I do” with a few added edible arrangements compliments of Irie Weddings & Events, a Colorado-based business with weed wedding planners adding some extra greenery to the big day.

Reposted from New York Post written By Jeanette Settembre, Moneyish

“We’re a one-stop shop that helps canna couples find the right vendor and venues for their weed wedding,” says Bec Koop, co-founder of Irie, who helps pot smoking partners — or, as she calls them, “canna couples” — toke with party guests. “There’s so many ways you can incorporate it.”

In 2014, Colorado’s legal marijuana market reached total sales of $700 million, and that’s when Koop started up Cannabis Concierge Events and Buds & Blossoms, devoted to incorporating weed into events and decor. She merged the two businesses as a one-stop weed wedding planning shop with Irie in 2017, an all-female run business in Denver working with a range of local cannabis-friendly vendors. They’ve planned weddings for people ranging in age from 21 to mid-60s.

“I’m a daily medical marijuana user and I was not going to go through one of the most stressful and exciting days of my life without the way that I manage my pain,” says Lauren Gibbs, who hired Irie last year to serve weed and provide the decor and flower arrangements at her wedding.

“Weddings create a really great opportunity for people to be exposed to cannabis in a really classy setting. People were so excited to try it, and it really created a festive atmosphere that I couldn’t have gotten with alcohol alone,” she adds.

Couples simply visit a dispensary of their choice and select and purchase cannabis in their favorite strains. An ounce of it can cost around $100 to $250 at Colorado dispensaries. Irie offers cannabis packages that will incorporate weed in bouquets, flower arrangements, centerpieces and cocktails, complete with bud-tending services. (That’s a weed bartender, btw.) Budtenders offer up strains to achieve ideal highs and serve up weed cocktails to enhance the experience. Couples can choose a build-your-own “Bud Bar” complete with joints, glass pipes, small vaporizes, and edibles.

If you’re unfamiliar with the kind of weed you want, Irie serves as a consultant helping customers create a customizable strain menu catered to the intended wedding vibe. For those looking to get a body high there’s “BC Height,” which is an earthy blend of vanilla and berry. “Cherry Lime Haze” gives off a more uplifting high that’s great for guests looking to party. Another more relaxing strain is “Good Medicine,” a sweet mango flavor that gives off more subtle high.

“Sativa is more uplifting. It’s going to make you get up and dance,” assures Madlyne Kelly, co-founder of Irie. “Indica is much more relaxing and has more of an effect on your body,” she explains of the two cannabis plant varieties.

Bud Bar packages cost between $250 and $500, not with cannabis but including lighters, cleaning materials and selected smoking apparatuses like bowls or bongs. For weddings with more than 30 guests, an additional budtender is required for $15 an hour. Planning packages start at $200 and cost as much as $5,000 depending on customization. The $3,000 O.G. Kush plan, for example, offers everything from coordinating vendors and the $420 Elopement Plan includes an officiant, photographer and dinner reservation for the couple. For a steeper $5,000 Irie will plan your entire event from venue selecting to floral arrangements, party favors and all other stressful logistics.

“Might as well enjoy it on the biggest and most stressful day of your life especially if it helps with anxiety and puts you in a better headspace for your big day,” says Koop.

Women's Cannabis Chamber of CommerceWomen’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce moving women beyond empowering and inspiring into action and business success.

 

Leadership

Are Women Taking Charge of the Cannabis Industry Leadership?

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Women Owned Cannabis Businesses, Women Who Inspire

The Cannabis Industry is a burgeoning industry, and as pioneers in this exciting new world, we have the honor of breaking ground and setting standards to pave the way for generations to come. One of the most fascinating developments in the cannabis industry is the rise of women in the workplace, most notably in positions of power and leadership at the head of cannabis companies.

Reposted from Leafly.com written by Lisa Rough

Women Holding Leadership Positions

The cannabis industry is comprised of scrappy, tenacious individuals who aren’t opposed to taking a risk, and in a sector that’s struggling to break free of former stoner stereotypes and debilitating social stigmas, women are leading the way. According to a 2015 survey from Marijuana Business Daily, women held 36% of leadership positions in the industry, including 50% of leadership roles in processing and infused product companies, and 63% of executive roles at testing labs.

When MJBiz conducted an updated survey on the topic in August 2017, the number of women in leadership roles had fallen to 27% of executive-level roles, although the presence of women in leadership roles in ancillary sectors of the industry holds strong: 42% of women held executive roles in supplemental cannabis services companies, and women still own and operate 35% of medical and retail cannabis shops.

No matter how you slice it, when comparing these numbers to women in the general US workforce, the difference is stark. Women hold 52% of professional level jobs, but make up only 26.5% of executive or senior-level roles, hold only 21% of board seats, and comprise just 5.2% of American CEO positions.

Why are women so prominent in leadership roles in the cannabis world? One factor could be related to the relatively low barrier for entry―because the industry is still growing and there’s no concrete blueprint for success, right now anyone can try their hand at making it big with some overhead cash, grit, and a little creativity.

Secondly, although cannabis consumption generally skews male, women are becoming increasingly interested in the plant for medicinal and therapeutic purposes. In a 2017 study published by the Drug and Alcohol Journal, the percentage of women regularly consuming cannabis is on the rise, although the gender gap still remains prominent. Between 2002 and 2014, the percentage of women using cannabis increased by 3% overall, and Leafly saw a significant increase in female interest between 2015 and 2016, with 27% more visits from female consumers than male consumers.

Attracting female consumers means making a new space for women to co-exist in the industry, and who knows how to do that better than women themselves?

Challenges and Complexities

Leafly recently attended Intersection, an event designed to confront and discuss how women can impact technology in the cannabis sphere, featuring an all-female panel to gain a better understanding of the complexities and challenges confronting women in the cannabis industry. AC Braddock, the CEO of Eden Labs in Seattle, was one of the foremost panelists who offered some advice for women in the cannabis industry.

“In order to move forward, you have to understand the rules and regulations, you have to understand the legislative process,” she recommended. “You must be politically savvy and understand the political process, and you’ve got to be mainstream.”

Sarah Blankinship, CEO of Right Sciences, expressed her surprise at ending up in the industry. “If you would have told me that I was going to end up in the cannabis industry, I would have definitely thought you were smoking what we are here to talk about tonight.”

Dr. Janice Knox, one of the founders of the American Cannabinoid Clinics, after being contacted by former patients who were seeking assistance entering the medical marijuana program and looking for answers from a certified physician, found herself at a bit of a loss. “How could I be a doctor and not be able to answer questions about the endocannabinoid system?”

Six years after her formal retirement, Knox re-entered the medical world, this time as a medical marijuana-certifying physician and advocate. “My mission now as a scientist is to spread as loudly and as far as I can that cannabis is medicine,” she explained.

Medical Cannabis First

Knox’s mission seemed to be a consensus across the group. “This industry will not flourish, will not move forward, unless it’s on a medical platform,” emphasized Braddock.

Mara Gordon, a cannabis researcher and founder of Aunt Zelda’s and Zelda Therapeutics, described her frustration entering the medical marijuana realm as a patient. “When I came in as a patient, I entered into an industry with no lab testing, and no dosing,” she said.

Rather than leaving empty-handed, the lack of specialization inspired her. “I was going to solve the dosing conundrum,” she told the Intersection audience. “This was why I had to create all these companies. I had to create a medical practice, I had to create medicines that were well-understood, with testing labs, software to allow the doctor to make dosing recommendations.”

Braddock spoke up about the importance of vigilant patients, as well. “Get politically involved. Go into the dispensary and ask for organic cannabis, ask for the medicinal products that they’re required to have…The average consumer spends about $70 per month as a recreational consumer, compared to about $800 per month as therapy. Wellness products should range from ‘I just wanna feel good,’ to ‘I want to treat my cancer.’”

She also brought up the stigma that still plagues women who are curious about cannabis for treatment or therapeutic purposes. “There’s such a stigma―50% of women on pharmaceutical drugs who try CBD stop taking the pharmaceuticals and they start to see real change. You have to really think about raising your hand, not just as a retailer, but as a patient.”

The Future of Women in Cannabis

“Hopefully, what we’re seeing is the last flash and burnout of an old way of politics and medicine,” Braddock speculated. “It comes from a very patriarchal basis of power our world has been run from for thousands of years―forever. I feel like people are holding onto that as hard as they can, and just showing who they really are, and I really hope that it’s their last dance.”

“What’s going to come from that is a new modern way of doing business, of healthcare, of everything.” She paused. “I would love to see this industry change the social justice system.”

With women taking the driver’s seat and the industry evolving at a breakneck speed, it’s only a matter of time before we see women and cannabis changing the way businesses are run, and, hopefully, taking aim at the glass ceiling.

“All we have to do is keep backing it and keep doing this, because,” Braddock surveyed the audience, “we are at the precipice for a massive change.”

Women's Cannabis Chamber of Commerce“If you want something said, ask a man; if you want something done, ask a woman.” —Margaret Thatcher

Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

 

Cannabis business opportunity

Cannabis Business Opportunity Grow for Women in Ohio

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Cannabis business opportunity has attracted women in other states, where they have stepped up as leaders in the industry. Could Ohio women follow suit?

The following blog post was reposted from the Columbus Navigator and written by Nora Jaara

“I see a lot of women who either hold high title positions or are coming together to take lead in this industry,” Alyssa Baker, the deputy director for the central Ohio chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), said.

Ohio’s fledgling medical marijuana program is expected to be fully operational by September 2018. While women’s impact on the state’s industry has yet to be seen, Baker said women will be a “huge presence,” both in Ohio and nationwide.

A survey conducted by Marijuana Business Daily in 2015 found women made up a greater share of leadership in the cannabis industry than they did in others. For example, the report found that women held about 36% of leadership positions in the industry as a whole.

Women made up about 63% of high-level positions in testing labs and 50% of high-level positions at infused products and processing companies, according to Marijuana Business Daily’s survey.

However, women remain underrepresented in other areas of the industry. They held 28% of executive-level positions in investment, for example.

The application period for medical marijuana cultivators closed in June. Baker said she looked over the list of applicants and was disappointed to see few women pursuing cannabis business opportunity. However, she said their leadership presence doesn’t necessarily have to come through with cultivation facilities.

According to Baker, emerging cannabis business opportunity may draw women into the industry.

Gia Morón, the director of communications for Women Grow, said there is “great potential” in cultivation and ancillary services. Ancillary services providers don’t directly deal with cannabis like growers and dispensaries do. Rather, they provide other kinds of assistance, such as consulting, packaging, security, and equipment. Women Grow used to have a market in Ohio and hopes to have one again. “We think Ohio is a great market for women leaders in the cannabis industry,” Morón said.

Women have also served as a powerful force in the realm of advocacy, Baker added, and she has seen many of them take on leadership roles in that area of the industry. “There’s a lot of strong women in Ohio who I feel have done a lot of thankless work,” Baker said.

 Women's Cannabis Chamber of CommerceWomen’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce moving women beyond empowering and inspiring into action and business success.

Marijuana's image

Marijuana’s Image is being Changed by Women Consumers

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

In a blip in time, marijuana’s image has been rebranded from sketchy to consumer-friendly, largely thanks to female executives disassociating the plant’s positive attributes from its historically bad rap. Women dominate from a consumer standpoint, too—from Apothecanna’s ganja-infused moisturizers to Whoopi & Maya’s THC-laced bath soaks, it seems there are no lucrative opportunities left unturned. In the midst of this canna-commodity boom, one company is gaining an edge by taking marijuana’s image a little farther south than it’s used to.

The following blog post was reposted from Good.is and written by Kate Ryan

Leading the charge in this seismic shift toward canna-acceptance is Brittany Confer, a community leader and public relations expert for Foria Pleasure, a company that peddles impeccably designed, cannabis-packed products for women. Whether you’re looking to enhance sexual pleasure with THC-saturated personal lubricants, ease menstrual cramps with vaginal suppositories, or even intensify anal sex with Foria’s newest creation, Foria Explore, they’ve got you covered. But beyond expanding consumers’ sex lives and marijuana’s image, Foria is the kind of company, Confer believes, that “will play catalyst to future cannabis legalization in other states.”

With the exception of one delicate, gold marijuana leaf embossed on the label, nothing about the products’ packaging would suggest its primary component is weed. When absorbed vaginally, the 2.5mg of THC in each spray of Foria Pleasure and 60mg of THC and 10mg of CBD in each Foria Relief suppository relax pelvic muscles and increase blood flow without initiating a psychotropic high or a serious case of the munchies. “Because we focus mainly on products that produce little to no psychoactivity (when used as intended),” says Confer, “it is easier for people to view cannabis less as a recreational ‘drug’ and more as a therapeutic medicine.” Though, like any THC-infused edible, the effects can sometimes take up to an hour to kick in, depending on the user’s body chemistry.

Currently available in Colorado and to California residents with a physician’s recommendation letter, the widespread sale of Foria products hinges on the federal legalization of marijuana. When and if that happens, these not-so-dinner-conversation friendly items will have a leg up in the mainstream market thanks to the refreshingly sophisticated packaging and Confer’s own hard work evangelizing women’s sexuality and marijuana’s image.

Realizing she wanted to support a company with more purpose than a bathing suit or nail polish brand, Confer jumped at the chance to work with Foria cofounder Mathew Gerson. On the decision to lead the brand’s marketing efforts, she says,

I saw it as an opportunity to empower women, to encourage women to take control of their own pleasure experience, to facilitate sexual equality, to educate people on the therapeutic benefits of cannabis and to support my personal desires as a long time cannabis legalization advocate. For me it was the perfect fit of powerful movements.”

Since she started at her new position, Confer says she’s been inspired daily by the positive feedback she’s received via “touching patient testimonials.” One woman, for example, reached out after Foria Relief put an end to her decade-long battle with endometriosis. Not only did the product ease her pain sans pharmaceuticals, it helped strengthen her relationship with her partner as well. “I feel like a super hero when I hear that,” says Confer.

With plans to expand internationally, Foria hopes to expose people all over the world to the medicinal benefits of cannabis and offer alternatives to pharmaceuticals. If Foria’s success and Confer’s tenacity are any indication, women will dictate the cultural reimagining of a socially active and sexually liberated stoner. As Confer echoes, “The possibilities are endless.”

Emma Watson
‘I think women are scared of feeling powerful and strong and brave sometimes. There’s nothing wrong with being afraid. It’s not the absence of fear, it’s overcoming it and sometimes you just have to blast through and have faith.’

Women's Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

www.WomensCannabisChamberofCommerce.com

 

Jessica VerSteeg

Jessica VerSteeg is Aiming to Link the Fractured Parts of the Cannabis Industry

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Jessica VerSteeg’s Paragon is on a mission to apply blockchain technology to fix many of the issues in the cannabis industry.

Jessica VerSteeg has enjoyed quite a bit of success in the public eye. She is a former Miss Iowa and was also a contestant on CBS’ “Amazing Race.” But Jessica Versteeg has set out to find success in a whole industry.

The following blog post was reposted from MGretailer.com  and written by Danny Reed

She made the transition into the cannabis industry with AU Box, a delivery service that dropped off cannabis products to her client’s doorstep. This is where she noticed some of the issues hampering the cannabis industry.

“I found problems with AU Box that I was coming up against, like verifying lab results,”Jessica VerSteeg told mg.

Her experiences with Au Box and the realization that there were no reliable centralized sources of information for the cannabis industry, motivated her to come up with a solution. Jessica VerSteeg thought that blockchain technology could help link all of the scattered information that is crucial to the cannabis industry. That is what drove her to create Paragon, which will use “Paracoins” as its cryptocurrency.

One of the biggest and most well-known problems in the cannabis industry is related to banking, or the lack thereof. Since cannabis is illegal on a federal level, banks are unwilling to work with companies in the industry. This creates a difficult situation, especially for dispensaries and growers. They have cash and cannabis on hand, making them a target for criminals. And hoarding the cash into a far away safe does not always solve the problem. Businesses have to be able to make financial transactions instantly, whether it is paying employees or for professional services. So that usually means keeping a fair amount within reach.

But what if there was another way to pay bills, without keeping piles of cash around? Jessica VerSteeg may be able to provide an option. If the industry were to adopt Paracoin then it would “take a large percentage of cash off the market,” according to Jessica VerSteeg. “Basically, anything and everything in the industry, from lawyers to lab fees to PR firms can be paid in crypto.”

Besides providing a safer payment system, blockchain technology can be used to protect sensitive data, something the cannabis industry has an abundance of. Strain testing results, pesticide levels, and THC/CBD percentages could all be added to the blockchain ledger, providing consumers with accurate information. Traditional databases are vulnerable to data theft. This can pose a major problem for patients that do not want medical information, or even the fact that they use cannabis out in the public. Patient and customer identification, physician recommendations and much more could be centralized for access, but protected from those who should not have it.

Paragon is also looking to address another issue many in the cannabis industry experience. Finding a cannabis friendly workspace can be tough. Even companies that do not produce cannabis flower are likely to have infused products sent to them by other companies. This can create a major issue for landlords who are weary of becoming a target for law enforcement.

Jessica VerSteeg is planning on offering professional coworking spaces for members of the cannabis industry.

“Now you can be in a space with like-minded people in a comfortable environment and you may even end up working with other people there,” VerSteeg said.

Madonna
‘To the doubters and naysayers and everyone who gave me hell and said I could not, that I would not or I must not – your resistance made me stronger, made me push harder, made me the fighter that I am today. It made me the woman that I am today. So thank you.’

Women's Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

www.WomensCannabisChamberofCommerce.com

Women's Health and Cannabis

WOMEN’S HEALTH AND CANNABIS: WHAT TO RE-THINK AND REPLACE IN YOUR MEDICINE CABINET

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Cannabis Lifestyle, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Women’s Health and Cannabis class available online through Green Flower Media.

Women’s health and cannabis encompasses every thing from skincare to insomnia, stress management to PMS, today’s cannabis products provide a safe, natural alternative treatment for a surprisingly wide spectrum of women’s ailments without the harmful side effects of conventional pharmaceutical cures.

In this new, live-class, SAVA founder Andrea Brooks explores a comprehensive array of safe and effective cannabis treatments specifically for women’s health issues:

  • Explains how to refine your daily health and beauty regimen using cannabis products,
  • Shows how to replace your medicine cabinet with optimal CBD solutions
  • Equips you with the tools, questions and acumen you need to be an informed and empowered cannabis consumer:
  • From headaches, to muscle and joint pain to insomnia and even PMS, discover how cannabis products can be used on a regular basis, safely and without the side effects of pharmaceutical aids.
  • Discover how to create a daily cannabis self-care routine without the worry of psychoactive (high) effects.
  • Learn what to products to stock replace in your medicine cabinet to treat basic everyday ailments like skin care, pain management and and first aid issues.

Sign up today and discover how cannabis could be the perfect solution to reclaim your health, beauty… and life. See more classes and videos at Green Flower Media.

Instructor: Andrea Brooks Founder and CEO of SAVA

Andrea is the Founder and CEO of SAVA, an e-commerce platform for hand-crafted cannabis goods. A program development specialist with expertise in the field of the health and human services, Ms. Brooks has worked with NGOs around the world including Israel and the Palestinian Territories, Tanzania, Nigeria and San Francisco, Ms. Brooks is a past recipient of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission’s Fair Housing Award for developing new reasonable accommodation programming for individuals with disabilities. She has served as Vice-Chair on two separate San Francisco governmental advisory bodies, including the Commission for Animal Control and Welfare and is the Co-Chair of the Bay Area Women Grow Chapter. She is currently working to bring high-quality cannabis medicine to patients throughout California.

Women-owned dispensaries

13 Fantastic Women-Owned Dispensaries to Support

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Women Owned Cannabis Businesses, Women Who Inspire

There’s a lot of discussion about diversity in the cannabis industry, but in terms of a gender gap, cannabis is actually more welcoming for female leaders and women-owned dispensaries than many other career paths. That said, there’s still a definite gap. The best way to help close it? Support the many fantastic women-owned dispensaries already out there. After considering countless submissions, the following are thirteen of our favorites across North America.

13 Women-owned dispensaries

3D Cannabis Centers (Denver, CO / Salida, CO)

Founded by Toni Savage Fox, 3D Cannabis Centers cemented its spot in cannabis history as the site of the first legal recreational cannabis sale, at the Denver location on January 1, 2014. Since then, Savage Fox has opened an additional location in Salida and used her fame and influence to make waves in the industry through organizations including NORML, NCIA, Women Grow, Marijuana Policy Project, and many more. The 3D team ensures their cannabis is of utmost quality by keeping a full-time scientist and full-time engineer on staff, and backing their products with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. When you stop by the Denver store in particular, be sure to peek into the state-of-the-art on-site grow room to see plants and clones being coaxed toward full maturity.

Mindful

MiNDFUL, headed up by CEO Meg Sanders, has been recognized by Women Grow as the largest woman-led cannabis company in America. The dispensary chain, which is dedicated to growing exceptional craft-quality cannabis, has five locations spanning the medical and recreational industries in two very different states, Illinois and Colorado. In Colorado, visit stores in Denver (medical and recreational), Colorado Springs (medical), Berthoud (medical), or Aurora (recreational); in Illinois, check out the Addison location on the fringe of Chicago.

Simply Pure

As the first black female dispensary owner in Colorado, Wanda James is an industry pioneer as well as an inspiration. In fact, James didn’t even realize she was a first until someone told her, and rightly asserts that there should be far more like her in the industry. Prior to owning a dispensary, she served on Barack Obama’s finance committee in 2008, and currently works as CEO of Simply Pure, which she co-owns with her husband Scott Durrah. A trailblazer at the epicenter of America’s legal adult-use cannabis culture, James, along with her team, places an emphasis on procuring the highest-quality cannabis available on the market.

Read Entire Article written by Brett Konen, an editor at Leafly specializing in lifestyle content, at Leafly

Marijuana Marketing for Businessess

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is limited to four entrepreneurs. It is an intense one day workshop that provides you with a personalized marketing plan and strategy, the tools to initiate and maintain it, and marketing resources. The workshop is a cost-effective solution to launching a successful marketing campaign Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is an investment in the success and growth of your company.

For more information visit The Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Marijuana Businesses, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Marijuana Marketing for BusinessesMarijuana Marketing for Businesses teaches entrepreneurs the “how to’s” of marketing with focus on increase profitability and market position. The lack of a good marketing strategy and the knowledge to initiate it affects profitability and expansion. Your marketing campaign can make or break a business.

Starting a business is a huge commitment of time and money. You can have the best product or service available. You have a website, logo, fanpage, cards, you are ready for the customers or clients. “If you build it they will come” only worked the movie (Field of Dreams). Your company needs a plan to bring the customers or clients.

You need a marketing plan and strategy – Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

You may be thinking that you do not need a multi-level marketing plan and strategy, all you have to do is set up a table at an event.  What distinguishes your business from the other businesses using the same strategy? Are you reaching the people who cannot get to your table? How do you turn the attendees into your customers or clients?

You need a marketing plan and strategy – Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

How do you reach the people who do not attend the events?

What type of networking events are effective?

Are print ads profitable?

Can you be doing more with social media platforms?

Is your SEO current?

Are you doing SEM?

You don’t have the answers. Consequently, you randomly select an action to focus on or you begin looking into hiring a marketing agency and realize it is not in your budget.

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is limited to four entrepreneurs. It is an intense one day workshop that provides you with a personalized marketing plan and strategy, the tools to initiate and maintain it, and marketing resources. The workshop is a cost-effective solution to launching a successful marketing campaign Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is an investment in the success and growth of your company.

For more information visit The Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

 

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

Why You Need Marijuana Marketing for Your Business

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Marijuana Marketing Classes, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Marijuana Marketing for BusinessesMarijuana Marketing and Why Your Company Needs It.

  • Marijuana Marketing is complex due to the advertising restrictions and legal status.
  • Therefore marijuana businesses have relied on social media platforms to deliver their marketing message. Ultimately consumers find and connect with marijuana businesses and information online. It is crucial to your business to be able to maximize your online marketing and presence.
  • To summarize, Marijuana Marketing for Businesses gives you the knowledge and tools to maintain and manage your marketing strategy.  In essence the workshop enables you to set up and control an in-house marketing department.

 Marijuana Marketing for Businesses – What to Expect:

  • First of all, we require NDA’s  to explicitly protect the business, creative and intellectual property of those attending.
  • Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is limited to 4 entrepreneurs in order to provide each attendee with more personalized instruction.
  • By the time the workshop ends each attendee will have a completed marketing strategy that is uniquely theirs. and schedule for initiating strategy
  • Knowledge not Bullshit.

Who should attend Marijuana Marketing for Businesses:

  • Dispensaries
  • Cultivators
  • MIPs
  • Hemp Businesses
  • CBD manufacturers
  • Concentrate producers
  • Start-ups

What you will learn from Marijuana Marketing for Businesses:

Ultimate Optimization

  • SEO
  • SEM
  • Best Keywords specifically for marijuana searches
  • Best Hashtags for your business
  • Rich Content
  • Boosting online rankings

Analytics including.

  • How to interpret and understand website and social media analytics
  • How to set up tracking.
  • Determining ROI.

Profiling and Analyzing Your Competitors

How to Market to your Demographics

How to Expand your Demographics through marketing.

Writing Content for the purpose of reaching different markets.

Marketing Regulations, Restrictions, and equally important, how to keep Facebook from closing your account.

How to Utilize Social Media to drive traffic to your website and business.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • You Tube
  • Blogs
  • Videos

How to Utilize Social Media to establish your brand locally and equally important national brand recognition.

Determining the Social Influencers in the marijuana community.

Online marijuana focused sites to post to.

Online Advertising.

Additionally, Marijuana Marketing for Businesses explores the ROI of print ads, hosting events and sponsoring events, as well as, guerilla marketing. A point often overlooked is guerilla marketing and the role it plays in attracting customers.

Your Business’ Marketing Plan and Strategy and the ability to launch your plan.

During the process you will be imputing and customizing information into a marketing plan and marketing strategy plan that is uniquely yours.   As has been noted, limiting the size of Marijuana Marketing for Businesses allows attendees to ask questions that are relevant to their brand and vision.

Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

Groups working to develop standards for cannabis businesses

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Marijuana Policies, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Marijuana Marketing for BusinessesCannabis trade groups, state officials and marijuana industry leaders are pursuing the development of standards and best practices covering organic certification, labor practices and energy use in a bid to further legitimize and professionalize the industry.

These efforts could bolster both the marijuana sector’s image among consumers and MJ companies’ bottom lines.

Organic certification, for example, could allow cannabis companies to shore up consumer confidence about the safety of their products and allow businesses to set higher prices for such items – much like organic fruit and vegetable growers.

Standards governing ethical labor and business practices could enable marijuana companies to set themselves apart from rivals.

And standards related to energy use and sustainable practices could help cannabis growers, in particular, become more efficient and thereby more profitable.

While other groups have developed standards for certain parts of the industry in the past – including guidelines on cultivation, manufacturing, labeling, testing and packaging – getting the entire industry to agree to them isn’t easy.

The fragmented cannabis industry lacks national powerhouse companies to help dictate best practices, and a variety of competing views on how standards should be developed makes implementation a steep hill to climb. Without a clear path forward, getting buy-in from industry players is a challenge, to put it mildly.

Organic standards

Recent headlines about pesticide-tainted cannabis in this country and Canada – where consumers have filed lawsuits against federally licensed growers – have underscored the push for organic standards in the marijuana industry.

“It’s critical that a clear, transparent standard is in place for the cannabis industry, because consumers expect that standard to exist,” said Ben Gelt, a board member of the Denver-based Organic Cannabis Association.

Policy makers and industry officials in states across the country, including Washington, Colorado and Maine, are looking at developing organic certification for cannabis.

It’s not an easy task. The federal government regulates standards for organic products, which has introduced a potential stumbling block for those trying to develop cannabis-related standards.

In Colorado, for example, an effort by state lawmakers to develop organic standards last year stalled in part amid concerns the U.S. Department of Agriculture would penalize state regulators for labeling a federally illegal substance as organic.

Gelt, however, said legislation is expected to emerge this year directing the Colorado Department of Agriculture to allow third-party groups to certify cannabis as organic. He’s optimistic such a measure would pass.

“The legislators agree with us that cannabis is here, it exists on the market, and consumers should be able to understand what product is organic and what product is not,” he said.

If organic standards are developed, Gelt expects a cannabis business owner will be in a position to charge more for organically grown marijuana, both at the retail and wholesale level. He likens it to the produce industry.

“If you buy an organic raspberry, it’s usually 15%-25% more expensive than the conventional raspberry,” he said.

Ethical business practices

To gain a leg up on rivals, MJ businesses must distinguish themselves in today’s competitive market, according to Ashley Preece-Sackett, executive director of the Ethical Cannabis Alliance in Portland, Oregon.

Standards governing ethical labor and business practices are one way to do so.

“Organizations and farms are looking for ways to let the consumer know that they care,” Preece-Sackett said. This would be a way for a cannabis business to show that its product is different and “better,” she added.

The ECA is looking to other industries for guidance while it develops its own standards.

“We’re not reinventing any wheel. We’re actually looking at fair trade standards and we’re ‘cannabinizing’ them so that we can have similar standards within our industry,” Preece-Sackett said.

ECA’s mission is to either create the standards for labor and business ethics on its own, or to link with other organizations for a unified voice. Those groups include the Organic Cannabis Association and the Resource Innovation Institute, a nonprofit that promotes energy and water conservation among MJ cultivators.

Linking the three organizations for such an effort could create a national approach, she said.

Preece-Sackett expects the ECA could have a “cannabinized” set of standards to market within the next three months.

“Once consumers catch up to that idea with cannabis, they’re going to be asking for those ethically grown products,” she added.

 

Read entire article by Bart Schaneman at Marijuana Business Daily

 

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Marijuana Marketing Classes, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

Marijuana Marketing for BusinessesMarijuana Marketing for Businesses teaches entrepreneurs the “how to’s” of marketing with focus on increase profitability and market position. The lack of a good marketing strategy and the knowledge to initiate it affects profitability and expansion. Your marketing campaign can make or break a business.

Starting a business is a huge commitment of time and money. You can have the best product or service available. You have a website, logo, fanpage, cards, you are ready for the customers or clients. “If you build it they will come” only worked the movie (Field of Dreams). Your company needs a plan to bring the customers or clients.

You need a marketing plan and strategy – Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

You may be thinking that you do not need a multi-level marketing plan and strategy, all you have to do is set up a table at an event.  What distinguishes your business from the other businesses using the same strategy? Are you reaching the people who cannot get to your table? How do you turn the attendees into your customers or clients?

You need a marketing plan and strategy – Marijuana Marketing for Businesses

How do you reach the people who do not attend the events?

What type of networking events are effective?

Are print ads profitable?

Can you be doing more with social media platforms?

Is your SEO current?

Are you doing SEM?

You don’t have the answers. Consequently, you randomly select an action to focus on or you begin looking into hiring a marketing agency and realize it is not in your budget.

Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is limited to four entrepreneurs. It is an intense one day workshop that provides you with a personalized marketing plan and strategy, the tools to initiate and maintain it, and marketing resources. The workshop is a cost-effective solution to launching a successful marketing campaign Marijuana Marketing for Businesses is an investment in the success and growth of your company.

For more information visit The Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce 

cannabis classes

Women Are Growing a More Diverse Cannabis Industry

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Marijuana Businesses, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

cannabis classes

Women are growing a more diverse cannabis industry. Marijuana prohibition in the US is quickly losing ground, with 13 states having passed decriminalization laws since 1973 and at least 20 states poised to vote on similar measures in 2016. As cannabis inches towards broader legalization, it has created the country’s fastest-growing industry––and women are investing early. While people have been using and consuming the plant for ages, its ‘official’ market is growing almost from scratch, allowing female entrepreneurs to carve out a space for themselves in it from the beginning.

The cannabis industry, like many others, is stereotypically thought of as largely male-dominated, but today women hold more executive positions in it than in any other field. Melissa Meyer, head of the New York chapter of cannabis entrepreneurs networking group Women Grow said participation has grown due to women supporting and educating each other through groups like these, and women from other fields being drawn in by the flexibility of the burgeoning industry.

“Many industries that attract really smart women, like tech, media, and finance are largely male-dominated,” she said. “Some very talented women aren’t satisfied there, and are bleeding from those industries and taking the opportunity to start a culture from scratch. In the cannabis industry, we are able to set our own agenda, so even though it is still male dominated in terms of numbers, we are creating a space where the cultural agenda is being set by women.”

Read entire article at Elle.com

The Women’s Cannabis Chamber of Commerce’s cannabis classes include How To Get Into The Cannabis Industry:Launch, Marketing to Cannabis Consumers and Businesses, Branding for the Cannabis Market, and E-Commerce for cannabis-centric businesses which includes How to Build an E-Commerce site, how to Market Your E-Commerce Site.

The Chamber hosts monthly networking events designed to showcase the cannabis community and businesses.

Membership gives you access to discounts on cannabis classes and access to Members Only networking events, Think Tanks, and mentorship.

cannabis classes

Why Women Are Choosing Careers In The Cannabis Industry

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Uncategorized, Women Owned Cannabis Businesses

cannabis classesAs the marijuana market continues to grow, earning an estimated $3.4 billion in 2015 alone, women aren’t taking a backseat to the action. Leaving financially-secure corporate careers to become pioneers of the cannabis industry might seem reckless to some. However, with a rise in opportunities for new businesses, women are hitting the ground running and staking their claim on a piece of the already male-dominate, multi-billion dollar medical and recreational cannabis market.

Marijuana restrictions and regulations can be tricky to understand, making the market even harder to break into. With the help of some innovative organizations, women are being given the tools to help take control of the fastest growing stream of revenue in states with legalization laws. Beyond opening dispensaries and cultivation facilities, women are empowering other women in the ways of marijuana trade by ensuring a working knowledge of the rules, helping to create a female-dominate cannabis market.  Herb, Formerly The Stoner’s Cookbook